Democratic National Convention – Day Two – July 26, 2016

From Philadelphia’s Wells Fargo Arena, July 25th through July 28th

UPDATE: CSPAN Full Video of Day 2

DNCC Watch Live (when streaming)
(DNCC YouTube archive)

The list of speakers will be updated as more information becomes available.

Updated Speaker List:
Democratic National Committee Vice Chair of Voter Registration and Participation Donna Brazile
Former State Senator Jason Carter (Georgia)
House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi (California) and the Democratic Women of the House
Planned Parenthood Action Fund President Cecile Richards

The roll call vote is expected to take place around 4:00pm Eastern time.

July 26th Speakers

Tuesday July 26 | Wells Fargo Arena
Jelani Freeman

Jelani grew up in foster care in Washington, DC and is a former intern in Hillary Clinton’s Senate office. Since receiving his law degree, he has worked to bring opportunity to kids at risk.

Thaddeus Desmond

Similar to Hillary’s work at the Children’s Defense Fund, Thaddeus is a child advocate social worker in Philadelphia.

Dynah Haubert

Dynah, of Philadelphia, PA, is a lawyer who works for a disability rights organization and teaches those with disabilities to advocate for themselves.

Gavel In at 4:30 Eastern Time

Kate Burdick

Kate, originally from Philadelphia, PA, is a staff attorney at the Juvenile Law Center in Philadelphia.

Anton Moore

Anton, from Philadelphia, PA, founded and runs a nonprofit community group that strives to bring awareness and educate youth on gun violence.

Dustin Parsons

Dustin, from Little Rock, Arkansas, is currently a fifth grade teacher at an elementary school in his home state.

Students from Eagle Academy

As a senator, Hillary Clinton supported the creation of the Eagle Academy to educate at-risk youth in New York City. Eagle Academy was featured in the ad Came Through during the New York primary.

Joe Sweeney

Joe, of New York, NY, was a detective with the NYPD on September 11, 2001. When the towers were hit, he rushed down to the World Trade Center and began digging through the rubble for survivors.

Lauren Manning

Lauren was a former executive and partner at Cantor Fitzgerald. She is one of the most catastrophically wounded survivors of 9/11. Lauren battled single digit odds of survival, spending more than six months in the hospital and fought recovering through the next decade from an 82.5% total body burn. Lauren asked then Senator Hillary Clinton to support the injured and she has remained unflagging in her commitment and dedication.

Ryan Moore

Ryan, originally from South Sioux City, NE, has spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia dwarfism and has known Hillary Clinton since 1994 when his family came to Washington, DC for an event to advocate for health care reform. Brian Moore, Ryan’s father, lost his job when his employer was unwilling to cover treatment for Ryan’s health condition. Ryan has stayed in contact with Hillary ever since.

President Bill Clinton

Speaker: President Bill Clinton

Mothers of the Movement

Speaker: Mothers of the Movement

Gavel Out


From the DNCC Website:

DNCC Announces Headlining Speakers For Democratic National Convention In Philadelphia

Convention Will Showcase A Diverse, United, Energized Democratic Party Rallying Around Hillary Clinton in the Fight for an America That Is “Stronger Together”

Through narrative storytelling utilizing innovative technology, Hillary Clinton’s vision that we are stronger together will come into strong focus for the American people. A vision that America is at its best when we work together to solve our problems. We are stronger together when we build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top. We’re stronger when we work with our allies around the world to keep us safe at home. And we’re stronger when we respect each other and really listen to each other – when we lift each other up instead of tearing each other down.

Here is a preview of each night:

Monday: United Together

Featuring First Lady Michelle Obama, Senator Bernie Sanders and DREAMer Astrid Silva

Gavel time expected at 3:00pm

Monday will focus on putting the future of American families front and center and how we’re stronger together when we build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top and when everyone has a chance to live up to their God-given potential. DREAMer Astrid Silva will share her story and her fight to keep families together.

Tuesday: A Lifetime of Fighting for Children and Families

Featuring President Bill Clinton and Mothers of the Movement

Gavel time expected at 4:00pm

Tuesday will feature the roll call vote and how Hillary has spent her entire career working to make a difference for children, families, and our country. The Mothers of the Movement participating include Gwen Carr, Mother of Eric Garner; Sybrina Fulton, Mother of Trayvon Martin; Maria Hamilton, Mother of Dontré Hamilton; Lucia McBath, Mother of Jordan Davis; Lezley McSpadden, Mother of Michael Brown; Cleopatra Pendleton-Cowley, Mother of Hadiya Pendleton; Geneva Reed-Veal, Mother of Sandra Bland.

Wednesday: Working Together

Featuring President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden

Gavel time expected at 4:30pm

On Wednesday speakers will take an in-depth look at just how high the stakes are in this election and how Hillary has the experience and steadiness to bring people together to tackle the big challenges and get real results.

Thursday: Stronger Together

Hillary Clinton and Chelsea Clinton

Gavel time expected at 4:30pm

On the final day of the convention, Hillary will speak about her vision for our country – her belief that we are stronger together and that America is at its best when we work together to solve our problems.

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10 Comments

  1. Today is the 26th Anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disability Act:

    Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) authored what became the final bill and was its chief sponsor in the Senate. Harkin delivered part of his introduction speech in sign language, saying it was so his deaf brother could understand.

    • Passed the Senate on September 7, 1989 (76-8 Roll call vote)
    • Passed the House on May 22, 1990 (unanimous voice vote)
    • Reported by the joint conference committee on July 12, 1990; agreed to by the House on July 12, 1990 (377–28 Roll call vote) and by the Senate on July 13, 1990 (91-6 Roll call vote )
    • Signed into law by President George H. W. Bush on July 26, 1990

    From ADA.gov:

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, State and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation.

    President Barack Obama, last year on the ADA’s 25th anniversary:

    Remarks by the President on The Americans With Disabilities Act

    THE PRESIDENT: Hello, everybody! (Applause.) Well, welcome to the White House. And thank you so much, Haben, for that amazing introduction, and for working to make sure that students with disabilities get a world-class education, just like you have. So please give Haben a big round of applause. (Applause.)

    So on a sunny day 25 years ago — I don’t know if it was as hot as it is today — (laughter) — President George H.W. Bush stood on the South Lawn and declared a new American Independence Day. “With today’s signing of the landmark Americans [with] Disabilities Act,” he said, “every man, woman and child with a disability can now pass through once-closed doors into a bright new era of equality, freedom and independence.”

    Twenty-five years later, we come together to celebrate that groundbreaking law — (applause) — and all that the law has made possible. Thanks to the ADA, the places that comprise our shared American life — schools, workplaces, movie theaters, courthouses, buses, baseball stadiums, national parks — they truly belong to everyone. Millions of Americans with disabilities have had the chance to develop their talents and make their unique contributions to the world. And thanks to them, America is stronger and more vibrant; it is a better country because of the ADA. (Applause.) That’s what this law has achieved.

    White House Issues Page: Disabilities

    The President is committed to nurturing a society that values the contributions of all of our citizens and residents, including the approximately 50 million people in this country living with disabilities.

  2. “Presidential Proclamation — Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 2016

    ANNIVERSARY OF THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, 2016

    – – – – – – –

    BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    A PROCLAMATION

    On July 26, 1990, our Nation marked a pivotal moment in history for Americans with disabilities. Fueled by a chorus of voices who refused to accept a second-class status and driven by a movement that recognized that our country is stronger and more vibrant when we draw on the talents of all our people, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) enshrined into law the notion that Americans living with disabilities deserve to participate in our society free from discrimination. Twenty-six years later, as we mark this anniversary, we recognize all this milestone law has made possible for the disability community.

    The ADA sought to guarantee that the places we share — from schools and workplaces to stadiums and parks — truly belong to everyone. It reflects our Nation’s full commitment to the rights and independence of people with disabilities, and it has paved the way for a more inclusive and equal society. For the 6.5 million students and the approximately 50 million adults living with mental or physical disabilities, the ADA has swung open doors and empowered each of them to make of their lives what they will.

    Building on this progress is a priority for my Administration. The Federal Government has taken the lead in creating meaningful employment opportunities for people with disabilities. In my first term, I issued an Executive Order that called on Federal agencies and contractors to hire more people with disabilities — and today, more Americans with disabilities are working in Federal service than at any time in the last three decades. My Administration has vigorously enforced the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Olmstead decision — which determined that, under the ADA, people with disabilities cannot be unnecessarily segregated — and worked to deliver on the promise that individuals with disabilities have access to integrated, community-based services. The Affordable Care Act affirmed that Americans with pre-existing conditions can no longer be denied health insurance, and this year, we made it clear that health care providers must offer reasonable accommodations and ensure effective communication for individuals with disabilities in order to advance health equity and reduce health care disparities.

    As we commemorate this progress, we know our work to expand opportunity and confront the stigma that persists surrounding disabilities is not yet finished: We have to address the injustices that linger and remove the barriers that remain. Too many people with disabilities are still unemployed and lack access to skills training or are not paid fairly for their work. We must continue increasing graduation rates for students with disabilities to give them every chance to receive the education and training they need to pursue their dreams. We must make the information and communication technologies we rely on accessible for all people, and ensure their needs are considered and incorporated as we advance the tools of modern life. And we must keep fighting for more consistent and effective enforcement of the ADA in order to prevent discrimination in public services and accommodations.

    At a time when so many doubted that people with disabilities could contribute to our economy or support their families, the ADA assumed they could, and guided the way forward. Today, as we reflect on the courage and commitment of all who made this achievement possible, let us renew our obligation to extend the promise of the American dream to all our people, and let us recommit to building a world free of unnecessary barriers and full of deeper understanding of those living with disabilities.”

    [Presidential Proclamation — Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 2016 | whitehouse gov]
    https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/07/25/presidential-proclamation-anniversary-americans-disabilities-act-2016

  3. Official Schedule:

    “4:00 PM – 5:00 PM (EDT)

    Call to Order
    U.S. Representative and Convention Chair Marcia Fudge

    Invocation
    Dr. Ima Sherman Jackson

    Presentation of Colors
    Colonel Charles Young
    American Legion Post 682

    Pledge of Allegiance
    Mallory Weggemann

    National Anthem
    Timmy Kelly
    Timmy Kelly is from Pennsylvania and sang the National Anthem at the campaign launch in New York.

    Remarks
    Former U.S. Senator Tom Harkin
    Senator Harkin will speak on the 26th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, a law he wrote and helped pass. 

    Remarks
    Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes

    5:00 – 7:00 PM (EDT)

    Nominating Speeches and Roll Call Vote

    Remarks
    Governor Terry McAuliffe

    7:00 – 10:00 PM (EDT)

    Remarks
    House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Women of the House

    Remarks introducing Video Message
    Former State Senator Jason Carter

    Video Message from President Jimmy Carter

    Remarks
    U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer

    Host for the evening: Actress Elizabeth Banks 

    FIGHTS OF HER LIFE: KIDS AND FAMILIES 

    Remarks
    Thaddeus Desmond
    Thaddeus is a child advocate social worker in Philadelphia

    Remarks
    Dynah Haubert
    Dynah is a lawyer who works for a disability rights organization

    Remarks
    Kate Burdick
    Kate is a staff attorney at the Juvenile Law Center in Philadelphia 

    Remarks
    Anton Moore
    Anton founded and runs a non-profit community group that strives to bring awareness and educate youth on gun violence

    Remarks
    Dustin Parsons
    Dustin is a 5th grade teacher in Arkansas

    Remarks
    Daniele Mellott
    Daniele and Mark Mellott’s adoption of their son was made possible through the 1997 Adoption and Safe Families Act that Hillary championed as First Lady. 

    Remarks
    Jelani Freeman
    Jelani grew up in foster care and is a former intern in Hillary Clinton’s Senate office. Since receiving his law degree, he has worked to bring opportunity to kids at risk.

    Remarks
    Democratic National Committee Vice Chair of Voter Registration and Participation Donna Brazile

    Remarks
    Eagle Academy Principal and Students
    As a senator, Hillary Clinton supported the creation of the Eagle Academy to educate at-risk youth in New York City.

    FIGHTS OF HER LIFE: SOCIAL JUSTICE

    Remarks
    Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder

    Remarks
    Pittsburgh Chief of Police Cameron McLay

    Remarks
    Actor Tony Goldwyn

    Remarks
    Mothers of the Movement
    Sybrina Fulton, Geneva Reed-Veal, Lucy McBath, Gwen Carr, Cleopatra Pendelton, Maria Hamilton, Lezley McSpadden, and Wanda Johnson

    Mothers of Trayvon Martin, Sandra Bland, Jordan Davis, Eric Garner, Hadiya Pendleton, Dontré Hamilton, Michael Brown, Oscar Grant

    Performance
    Andra Day

    FIGHTS OF HER LIFE: WOMEN AND FAMILIES

    Remarks
    President of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund Cecile Richards

    Remarks
    Actresses America Fererra and Lena Dunham

    Remarks
    Mayor of Columbia (SC) Steve Benjamin

    Remarks
    U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer

    FIGHTS OF HER LIFE: STANDING UP FOR 9/11 FIRST RESPONDERS & SURVIVORS
    Introduction by Actress Debra Messing 

    Remarks
    Joe Sweeney
    Joe was a detective with the NYPD on September 11, 2001. When the towers were hit, he rushed down to the World Trade Center and began digging through the rubble for survivors.

    Remarks
    Lauren Manning
    Lauren spent more than 6 months in the hospital after 9/11 recovering from severe burns. As senator, Hillary Clinton helped Lauren get the care she needed.

    Remarks
    U.S. Representative Joseph Crowley

    FIGHTS OF HER LIFE: HEALTH CARE

    Introduction of Speaker
    Actress Erika Alexander 

    Remarks
    Ryan Moore

    Ryan has spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia dwarfism and has known Hillary Clinton since 1994 when they met during the fight for health care reform. Ryan has stayed in contact with Hillary ever since.

    Remarks
    Former Governor of Vermont Howard Dean

    FIGHTS OF HER LIFE: SECRETARY OF STATE

    Remarks
    U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar

    Remarks
    Ima Matul
    Sex Trafficking Survivor & Advocate 

    Remarks
    Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright

    10:00 – 11:00 PM (EDT) 

    Remarks
    President Bill Clinton 

    Introduction of Film
    Actress Meryl Streep

    Performance
    Alicia Keys

    [How to watch the Democratic convention 2016: DNC live stream, TV channel, and schedule of events – Vox]
    http://www.vox.com/2016/7/25/12268364/watch-dnc-democratic-convention-2016-live-stream-tv-channel-schedule-events

  4. Senator Barbara Mikulski nominates Hillary Clinton:

    Rep. John Lewis seconds the nomination

    Additional second by Na’ilah Amaru

    • Bill Clinton’s Speech, transcript: Read Bill Clinton’s Speech at the Democratic Convention

      On the attacks on his wife:

      CLINTON: Now, how does this [story of Hillary’s life] square? How did this square with the things that you heard at the Republican convention? What’s the difference in what I told you and what they said? How do you square it? You can’t. One is real, the other is made up.

      You just have to decide. You just have to decide which is which, my fellow Americans.

      The real one had done more positive change-making before she was 30 than many public officials do in a lifetime in office.

      (APPLAUSE)

      The real one, if you saw her friend Betsy Ebeling vote for Illinois today…

      (APPLAUSE)

      …has friends from childhood through Arkansas, where she has not lived in more than 20 years, who have gone all across America at their own expense to fight for the person they know.

      (APPLAUSE)

      The real one has earned the loyalty, the respect and the fervent support of people who have worked with her in every stage of her life, including leaders around the world who know her to be able, straightforward and completely trustworthy.

      The real one calls you when you’re sick, when your kid’s in trouble or when there’s a death in the family.

      The real one repeatedly drew praise from prominent Republicans when she was a senator and secretary of state.

      (APPLAUSE)

      So what’s up with it? Well, if you win elections on the theory that government is always bad and will mess up a two-car parade…

      (LAUGHTER)

      …a real change-maker represents a real threat.

      (APPLAUSE)

      So your only option is to create a cartoon, a cartoon alternative, then run against the cartoon. Cartoons are two- dimensional, they’re easy to absorb. Life in the real world is complicated and real change is hard. And a lot of people even think it’s boring.

      (APPLAUSE)

      Good for you, because earlier today you nominated the real one.

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